Monday, 30 August 2010

"York Week, Day One - NYMR"

I spent a delightful week in York with some good friends this last week, and we visited quite a few of Yorkshire's most popular heritage lines.

Our first railway visit came on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, NYMR for short. Here are my photographs from the day - be warned, the photographs of the S160 may distress those of a sensitive nature!



To my delight, ever popular 49395 (the sole surviving class G2a) was in steam, along with her freight link compatriot, 63395 (the sole surviving Q6). My preference for the North Eastern engine was tested, the Super D looking every bit the powerhouse it is.





The two engines then departed to everyone's delight, in a joint and spirited departure from Grosmont.



Disclaimer here - this was taken on the correct side of the fence that separates the S160's siding from the path alongside the NYMR works. I had to crane my neck and arm a bit to get the shot, mind!



While I didn't get a photograph of the most distressing sight on the line (the S15 in the long grass), the S160 - a United States locomotive, of second world war austerity heritage - was in a very bad state. Considering this locomotive appeared in Steam Railway Magazine in 1995, with such aplomb on the NYMR, the difference in the photographs of the engine in the magazine, and mine here, are indeed sobering.



I was rather surprised, if I am honest, to see that the majority of out of ticket stock was left out in the open on the NYMR - Dame Vera Lyn was apparently in the siding behind the S160 - and not looking any better. Perhaps I have been spoiled by the Great Central Railway, and Mid-Hants Railway, respectively, in this regard.



Given the NYMR's prestige, I still felt that many of the locomotive stock should be tarpaulin-ed at the very least - or as they do in Austrailia, tarred for preservation. A great shame to see, on a line which is otherwise the finished product for scenery, stock and general good natured demeanor, in terms of its staff. That said - there may be reasons I am not privy to as to the current situation, so I will happily retract my comments if anyone wishes to correct me (copleyhill@live.co.uk).

Even more distressing - here's what's left of 60007:



Nah, just joking!



It was in the workshops, being repaired. It was the first time I'd seen 60007 in the flesh for about four years, far too long frankly - it being my personal favourite of the preserved A4 pacifics.

It was a great day all round - we did a day trip to Whitby and back, the last leg being by a Sprinter unit to Whitby. Pub dinner at Lendals in York, and a great amount of banter at the cottage later on, and the day was perfect.

Until next time - where I will be relating our trip to the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway.

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